MKW: Coldray vs. Triple T (June 17, 2018)

Hey, everyone, my wife just had a baby last weekend, so my reviews are going to be fewer and shorter for the foreseeable future. But I don’t want to completely abandon my blogs. I’ll just make quicker posts and only review matches I really feel like watching.

Triple T is on a roll after his win over Uncle Money last time. Coldray hasn’t appeared since Shenzhen, but he’s back with manager Khan Spirasi. Guess he’s taking a break from calling out The Slam in KOPW. This match is for a spot in the Belt and Road Championship Tournament coming in August. That’s MKW’s new secondary singles title, and yes, they named it after a heavily-propagandized economic plan by the Chinese Communist Party. Search Google for “One Belt, One Road” and decide for yourself if it’s good for anyone besides China.

I was really into the first half of this match. Triple T was looking the best I’ve seen him (though I like his singlet better). Specifically, his Hogan leg drop was spot-on this time. Coldray’s promo skills are good, and he’s a fine hand in the ring.

Speaking of the ring, that’s my big negative. Both guys were slipped up by its size and the loose ropes, making a number of bits awkward in the second half of the match. I’m pretty sure I can blame the ring, because Coldray never seems to have these kinds of problems in KOPW. I’ve never seen Triple T anywhere else (but I’d like to), so I can’t speak to what kind of ring he’s most comfortable in.

The basic finish is Coldray accidentally bumping Khan Spirasi off the apron, setting him up to get squashed by a Swanton bomb from Triple T for the win. It’s scary to watch such a big guy do that move off of wobbly ropes, but he always manages to hit it.

Okay match that I would like to see again in a sturdier ring. I’m enjoying Triple T’s push, and I’m curious to see how far he goes in the tournament.

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MKW: Michael Su and Gabriel Martini vs. Ash Silva and Uncle Money (March 17, 2018)

Our Story So Far…
– Khan Spirasi is the manager of the Flat Earth Foundation, a tag team that believes we’re all being conned into thinking the earth is round. They’re not very understanding of those who don’t agree with them.
– Ash Silva and Uncle Money are members of The Stable and are both coming off of wins in Shenzhen last year.
– Italy’s Gabriel Martini lost to Ash in Shenzhen thanks to Uncle Money’s interference.
“The Masterclass” Michael Su is the first graduate of the MKW wrestling school, and Ash was his trainer. He was the referee for Ash’s tainted win over Martini.

Before the match, we have Khan Spirasi’s “Conspiracy Corner” interview segment. Spirasi talks like a stoned surfer dude, which is funny. He brings out Michael Su, and their conversation turns to Ash Silva. Su says Ash betrayed him when he joined The Stable and cheated to beat Gabriel Martini. Ash comes out and berates Su, telling him it’s all about success and money. Uncle Money comes out, and they attack Su until Martini makes the save and issues the challenge for a tag match. Khan Spirasi has disappeared.
This was all done in English, and it was a pretty good segment for the level they’re at.
Now on to the match!

I spent most of the match focusing on Gabriel Martini because I was hoping he would redeem himself after his performance against Ash in Shenzhen that I really didn’t like. Unfortunately, I don’t think he looks much better here. Some of his moves are all right, but a lot of the time, he looks more like a layman trying to be a wrestler (alá David Arquette or Karl Malone). He doesn’t seem to be taking things seriously. He gets off the apron and gets a drink of water while his partner is in trouble. He gabs with fans while his partner is in trouble. He He really just doesn’t seem to care that his partner is in trouble. He sits on the apron or the turnbuckle when he’s in the corner. He just comes across as very unprofessional throughout the match. Al on commentary says that he’s working with a hurt back, so maybe that explains some of it, but it doesn’t make it any easier to watch.

I thought that Michael Su looked fine in what may be his first match. He has some teacher/student chemistry with Ash. His strike rush works for him. His small package (if that’s what it was) needs work. I question him using a chokeslam as someone who isn’t all that big (probably the smallest guy in the match). But I’m interested in watching him develop. I wish he could work with someone with a lot of experience, but its hard to find people like that around these parts right now.

I would like to see Uncle Money work more power moves into his repertoire. He’s got a big upper body, like a football player. I feel like he should be doing more shoulder breakers and power slams or something. And I don’t like his corner splash. He tries to do it like a frog splash, but it just makes it look weaker. Just do a regular stinger splash. The cocky push-ups work for him, though, and the spear is a good signature.

Ash looked the best. Not perfect, but he carried the match as far as I could tell, and most of his moves looked good. I’d like to see him wrestle Su in a singles match sometime.

I really thought that the whole thing was too long. They did two hot tags, both to Martini, as if they didn’t like the results of the first one and decided to have a do-over. Also, there were too many scoop slams. Vary things up a bit, please, guys.

Ash and Uncle Money got the pin on Su with a Samoan drop/neckbreaker team move.

MKW: Flat Earth Foundation vs. Man Bros (December 16, 2017)

I think this is the debut of the Flat Earth Foundation as a team. Hell Shark is Xia Xingjia from CWE and the CWF, and Coldray used to be a referee for the CWF. They’re managed by the subtly named Khan Spirasi. He talks a little before introducing the team, and then Coldray cuts a lengthy promo in Chinese about how the fans are foolish for believing the world is round.

The Man Bros – Jeff and Kevin Man –  (not to be confused with the Bromans from TNA) are long-time HKWF wrestlers, and they’re the current AWGC Tag Team Champions. The titles aren’t on the line, though.

Aside from a little sloppiness here and there, this is a pretty standard tag match that gets its point across. After a sneak attack by the FEF and a comeback by the Man Bros, they settle into regular tag format. The Mans are obviously the more experienced team, as evidenced by the smoothness of their tandem move combinations. Hell Shark appears to be the workhorse of the FEF; he at least has the more interesting move set. Coldray, though, has a swagger about him that gives the team more character. The cameramen don’t put much focus on Khan Spirasi on the floor, but he can be heard shouting “F-E-F!” a few times.

Kevin Man is the babyface in peril here, and he does take a beating, especially from Hell Shark. Hell Shark may want to work on protecting his opponent better during some of his moves. His fisherman buster, German suplex, and 450 splash seem rather carelessly executed. Jeff Man looks good when he runs wild after the hot tag, but man, he and his brother could really stand to get some ring gear that makes them look like wrestlers instead of club hoppers.

After the Man Bros hit double dragon – a fireman’s carry tossed into a superkick – Khan Spirasi distracts the referee and Kevin goes after Coldray on the floor. Hell Shark lowblows Kevin and eventually squashes him with a 450 for the (upset?) victory. Al Leung on commentary speculates that this might earn then a future title shot.

Again, standard tag stuff with some kinks that could stand some tweaking. Hopefully the FEF will get lots of opportunities to develop.